Wooden Hut
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Our History

 

As best as those who were there remember it, FCF first met on July 4, 1982 in Will Hamilton's living room. Essentially, an unorganized group of local folks felt they couldn't find a church in Fairview they really fit--one with an emphasis on community, believing the Bible, and thinking deeply about faith.

 

For the first few weeks, this unnamed and unaffiliated group met at Will's house. Then it moved to David Fletcher's barn on Sugar Hollow Road, where Becky and Pat Stone took over leading the music. Then it moved to the present Pizza & More on 74 (which had been an auto parts store), where it was incorporated on March 2, 1983. Then it moved to the Triage First offices right below the current location of the church (which was at the time the garage for Will's medical office). At this point, it had its first membership class. Around a dozen people joined the church that day, including some who are still members today. 

Finally, in 1991, FCF got its act together enough to build the homey log church in use today. It was build with care and hard work by Jeff Hambley and Gino Pride, who inscribed a Bible verse on every log! These verses are on the sides that don't show.

FCF's first pastor was David Sevier (auto parts store days), then John Spence (garage days), then Lee Kiser (early log church days). While Lee was pastor, the church was a member of the Evangelical Presbyterian Church (EPC). However, the church eventually joined the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA). In 1995, the congregation hired Rusty Harper to be the pastor, and he has faithfully shepherded the congregation ever since. His approval exam took place publicly in the church building. At one point, the examining committee asked Rusty, "Can you explain how God can be at the same time three and one?" Rusty answered, "No." There was a long pause, which then he said, "I can describe it if you like."

Like anything else in this uncertain world, Fairview Christian Fellowship has had its ups and downs. It certainly has been led by and filled with well-intentioned but fallen sheep. The fact that, 35 years in, it's still around is a testament to God's faithfulness, love, and power much more than any of ours.